Colin Powell's '13 Rules': Read them here

Colin Powell had ‘an ability to bring people together’: Ari Fleischer

Former White House Press Secretary Ari Fleischer joins ‘America’s Newsroom’ following the passing of Former Secretary of State Colin Powell.

Gen. Colin Powell, the trailblazing former secretary of state who died Monday due to complications from COVID-19, famously detailed 13 rules to live by in his 1995 autobiography.

Read them below:

1. It ain’t as bad as you think. It will look better in the morning. 
2. Get mad, then get over it. 

COLIN POWELL, FORMER SECRETARY OF STATE, DEAD AT 84 FROM COVID-19 COMPLICATIONS 

General Colin Powell at the Build Series discussing his newest mission with America’s Promise to ‘Recommit 2 Kids’ campaign at Build Studio in April, 2017 in New York City. 
(Photo by Daniel Zuchnik/WireImage)

3. Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it. 
4. It can be done! 

Former President Ronald Reagan (L), former first lady Nancy Reagan (2nd R), General Colin L. Powell (R), former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his wife Alma Powell arrive for award ceremonies at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California in this Nov. 1993 file photo. 
(REUTERS/Fred Prouser)

5. Be careful what you choose. You may get it. 
6. Don’t let adverse facts stand in the way of a good decision. 
7. You can’t make someone else’s choices. You shouldn’t let someone else make yours. 

REMEMBERING COLIN POWELL UPON HIS DEATH: FORMER PRESIDENT BUSH CALLS HIM ‘A GREAT PUBLIC SERVANT’ 
8. Check small things. 
9. Share credit. 

Honoree Colin L. Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, speaks during the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s ‘Great Americans’ Medal ceremony in Dec.  2016 in Washington, DC.
( Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

10. Remain calm. Be kind. 
11. Have a vision. Be demanding. 

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12. Don’t take counsel of your fears or naysayers. 
13. Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.

Powell’s first memoir, “My American Journey,” was published in 1995.

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