161K COVID Cases, 1296 Deaths In US

As the Delta variant is spreading the pandemic to levels seen at the beginning of this year, 161331 new cases of coronavirus infections were reported in the United States on Thursday. With this, the national total has increased to 38,384,595, as per the latest data from Johns Hopkins University.

1296 additional casualties took the national COVID death toll to 633,566.

Florida reported the most number of cases – 21,765 – and most COVID-related deaths – 901.

California is the worst affected state in terms of both the COVID metrics, with 4,292,963 cases and a total of 65,506 people dying due to the disease there.

There is significant rise in the number of people hospitalized due to coronavirus infection in the country. The number has risen to 96,586, marking 29 percent increase in a fortnight, according to data compiled by New York Times.

The death rate doubled in a fortnight.

A total of 30,732,120 people have so far recovered from the disease in the country.

As per the latest data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a total of 172,171,009 people in the United States have been fully vaccinated against the coronavirus. This includes 81.4 percent of people above 65.

202,961,676 people, or 61.1 percent of the population, have received at least one dose.

A total of 365,767,674 vaccine doses have been administered so far nationally.

Meanwhile, in light of the Supreme Court ruling against the most recent CDC eviction moratorium, President Joe Biden has called on all entities that can prevent evictions – from cities and states to local courts, landlords, Cabinet Agencies – to urgently act to prevent evictions.

“The Biden Administration is disappointed that the Supreme Court has blocked the most recent CDC eviction moratorium while confirmed cases of the Delta variant are significant across the country,” the White House said in a statement. As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to COVID-19, it added.

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